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Self-Worth

The coast... by Giacomo della Sera on 500px.com

The most important thing in the Olympic Games is not to

win but to take part, just as the most important thing in life
is not the triumph but the struggle. The essential thing is not
to have conquered but to have fought well.
— Olympic Games Creed
I see that the future is bright with promise. It beckons me
forward into a more complete realization of my own worth
and my rightful place in the Universe.
— “The Science of Mind,” page 246


     Pablo Morales’ parents grew up in Cuba. In 1956, eight years
before Morales was born, the Morales family emigrated to
the United States. When Morales was born, his mother was
making sure her kids could swim. Morales took to swimming
with a passion. His love for it went way beyond recreational
swimming. He was a competitor — the 100-meter butterfly was
his specialty. Morales was determined and steadfast in his goal
to become a world-class Olympic swimmer. That persistence
paid off in the 1984 Olympics when he won the silver medal in
the 100-meter butterfly. After failing to make the team for the
1988 Olympics, Morales retired from competitive swimming
and went to law school. During this time, his mother died after
a long battle with cancer. The death of his mother rekindled his
desire to compete again. He put law school on hold; he would
try to make the 1992 Olympic team.
     His persistence paid off. He showed the same determination
and steadfastness that marked his first Olympic effort eight
years earlier. It all came down to one last race in Barcelona:
the 100-meter butterfly. Morales touched the wall three onehundredths
of a second ahead of his closest competitor. The
gold medal was his — by less than half a finger’s length.
     One of the most powerful gifts you can give another is to not
only recognize their worth but your own as well.



AFFIRMATION

My life is worthwhile, and I am worthy.


Daily Guide February 6, 2018 – Science Of Mind Magazine

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Posted on February 6, 2018, in Science of Mind and tagged , , . Bookmark the permalink. Leave a comment.

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